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Mozart Requiem

  • Requiem Aeternam
  • Kyrie Eleisoni
  • Dies Irae
  • Tuba Mirum
  • Rex Tremendae Majestatis
  • Recordare
  • Confutatis Maledictis
  • Lacrymosa
  • Domine Jesu
  • Hostias
  • Sanctus
  • Benedictus
  • Agnus De
  • Lux Aeterna

Symphonies 35 & 40

  • Molto Allegro
  • Andante
  • Menuetto
  • Allegretto Allegro
  • Assai
  • Allegro con spirito
  • Andante
  • Menuetto
  • Finale Presto

Piano Sonatas & Concerto No.25

  • Allegro maestoso
  • Andante
  • Allegretto
  • Piano Sonatra D Major K576 Allegro
  • Piano Sonatra D Major K576 Adagio
  • Piano Sonatra D Major K576 Allegretto
  • Piano Sonatra G Flat K282 Adagio
  • Piano Sonatra G Flat K282 Menuetto
  • Piano Sonatra G Flat K282 Allegro
  • Fantasia K396

REQUIEM

Mozart composed part of the Requiem in Vienna in late 1791, but it was unfinished at his death the same year. Count Franz von Walsegg, commissioned the piece for a requiem service to commemorate the anniversary of his wife’s death on 14 February.

The autograph manuscript shows the finished and orchestrated Introit in Mozart’s hand. Süssmayr  later claimed the Sanctus, Benedictus and the Agnus Dei as his own. Walsegg probably intended to pass the Requiem off as his own composition, as he is known to have done with other works.

This plan was frustrated by a public benefit performance for Mozart’s widow Constanze. She was responsible for a number of stories surrounding the composition of the work, including the claims that Mozart received the commission from a mysterious messenger who did not reveal the commissioner’s identity, and that Mozart came to believe that he was writing the requiem for his own funeral.

Symphony No. 35 is known as the Haffner Symphony. Mozart composed it in 1782. It was commissioned by the Haffners, a prominent Salzburg family, for the occasion of the ennoblement of Sigmund Haffner.

Symphony No. 40 in G minor, was written in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony”, to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony”, No. 25. The two are the only extant minor key symphonies Mozart wrote.

The date of completion of this symphony is known exactly since Mozart in his mature years kept a full catalog of his completed works;

Work on the symphony occupied an exceptionally productive period of just a few weeks during which time he also completed the 39th and 41st symphonies

Symphony No. 35 & 40

Piano Concertos

The Piano Concerto No. 25 in C major, K. 503, was completed on December 4, 1786, alongside the Prague Symphony, K. 504. Although two more concertos (K. 537 and K. 595) would later follow, this work is the last of what are considered the twelve great piano concertos written in Vienna between 1784 and 1786. Chronologically the work is the 21st of Mozart’s 23 original piano concertos.

K. 503 is now widely recognized as “one of Mozart’s greatest masterpieces in the concerto genre.”

However, it had long been neglected in favor of Mozart’s other “more brilliant” concertos, such as K. 467. Though Mozart performed it on several occasions, it was not performed again in Vienna until after his death, and it only gained acceptance in the standard repertoire in the later part of the twentieth century.

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Life of Mozart Collection

In terms of musical composition, all but the first five of his thirty-five years were astoundingly productive for Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–91). A stream of glorious symphonies, piano concertos, chamber music, operas and the sublime but unfinished Requiem poured from his pen. German philologist and archaeologist Otto Jahn (1813–69) was inspired to write a scholarly biography of Mozart following a conversation at Mendelssohn’s funeral in 1847. He immersed himself in intensive research on the composer and his music, publishing the first edition of this landmark work in four volumes between 1856 and 1859. Volume 1 covers Mozart’s life to 1778, Volume 2 considers Mozart the man, and Volume 3 discusses his final years and works.

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